‘They were happy because we gave them hope’

‘They were happy because we gave them hope’

“The most dangerous thing post-earthquake is epidemic diseases, so me and a few other doctors focussed our attention on that. We distributed purification pills to sanitise water, and sanitary pads. After a while we also went to help outside the Kathmandu valley. There we saw a lot of misery, whole villages were destroyed. People were searching their ruins for food, separating mud and rice. There was no rescue efforts there. There was nothing in that remote area, because nobody would walk for 3, 4, 5 hours to go for supplies. The most important thing we gave them was hope. We could see that in their eyes. They were not happy because we gave them sanitation, they were happy because we gave them hope.”

Photo: Pratik Rana

‘I spent the last 300 rupees of my relief money on him’

“My wife died 35 years ago. Now I only have my dogs. This one is Kancha. He needed medicine against rabies, so I spent the last 300 rupees of my relief money on him. I got NPR 25,000 [approximately £165] in all. But I needed asthma medicines. I needed appointments with the doctor. This was the last bit. Now it is gone.”

Photo: Pratik Rana

‘We became best friends because of the earthquake’

“We became best friends because of the earthquake. Her house collapsed and her family was moved to this camp, even though they are not from around here. Then she got admitted to the same school I am going to. First I saw her there and when I saw her again later in the camp, I talked to her. And since that day we became best friends.”

Photo: Pratik Rana

‘We were friends before, but were not so close’

“We were friends before, but were not so close. We were busy with our own lives. We used to talk when we met each other. But one thing I am happy about is that the earthquake has shown us the importance of life. I worry about Vijay when he is not around and there is an aftershock. I think he does that, too.”

Photo: Aman Jaswal